Wednesday, January 25, 2017

The Neon Beat on Radio George - 1.25.17

On The Neon Beat this week, Jukebox 1: The Marvelous Marilyn Maye launches this week’s selections with her rousing standard that has kicked of many of my radio shows, “Step to the Rear.” Trini Lopez takes the stage next for a salsa version of “Lemon Tree.” The Lettermen sing their version of “Shangri La” followed by a film song called “Georgie Girl” performed by Australia’s own, “the Seekers.” Enjoy wonderful Broadway selections sung by Mel Torme, Doris Day and Louis Armstrong. Frank Sinatra remembers how “It Happened in Monterrey.” We’ll spin some classic folk by the Kingston Trio as we remember poor Charlie and “the MTA.” Get your kicks
on “Route 66” with the Nat King Cole trio. Robert Goulet performs a great big band standard entitled “I’ll Get By as Long as I Have You.” You’ll hear period instrumentals by Ralph Flanagan’s Orchestra, Ralph Marterie, Walter Wanderley’s Hammond B-3 organ, and Arthur Fieldler conducting the Boston Pops with Chet Atkins. Rosemary Clooney sings a song with Benny Goodman’s Orchestra. Hear songs with Dusty Springfield, and Leroy Van Dyke with “The Auctioneer.”
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On the Neon Beat this week, Jukebox 2: Actor, comedian Jerry Lewis kicks off this set with his 1956 hit, “Rock-a-bye Your Baby with a Dixie Melody” (Jerry sings!) We’ll follow that up with Les Brown and his Band of Renown with the Ames Brothers singing, “I’ve Got My Love to Keep Me Warm.” Hear some great rock-n-roll/jazz fusion with Blood Sweat and Tears doing, “And When I Die.” We’ll track instrumental selections by Hugo Winterhalter, Billy Vaughn, Leroy Anderson, and Spencer Ross. Hear Barry Manilow performing a song he wrote for Dick Clark’s American Bandstand. Listen to Bing Crosby singing a song with actress Grace Kelly, “True Love.” Hear Nat King Cole sing the song, “Tenderly” followed up with The Association singing a film song from “Goodbye Columbus” followed by another movie song with Doris Day from the film, “the Man Who Knew Too Much.” Sing along with Mitch Miller doing, “Shine on Harvest Moon”, the Crew Cuts with “Sh’ Boom” and Harry James with Helen Forrest singing “I’m Beginning to See the Light.” Hit songs by Jane Morgan, Bette Midler and Eddie Fisher.
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On the Neon Beat this week, Jukebox 3: Frank Sinatra begins this hour with Nelson Riddle’s Orchestra singing, “You Do Something to Me.” Then we’ll spend “An Evening in Roma” with the kid: Dean Martin. Listen to the Chordettes with their 1960 hit, “Never on Sunday.” Listen to a couple of back-of-the-rack hits with Don Cherry singing, “Thinking of You” and Jill Corey’s “Love Me to Pieces.” You’ll hear a 1955 hit by a talent from Wellington, Kansas named Chuck Miller performing “The House of Blue Lights.” Nat King Cole spells out that four letter “L” word, “LOVE,” followed by Engelbert Humperdinck’s version of “Spanish Eyes.” We’ll pair up Glen Campbell with Bobbie Gentry for the song, “Morning Glory.” Hear the Andrews Sisters with a song written by Morey Amsterdam (from the Dick Van Dyke show), “Rum and Coca Cola.” Enjoy some honey in the horn with Al Hirt playing, “Java” and a lush version of “Yellow Bird” by period jazz vibraphone artist, “Arthur Lyman.” You’ll hear a country music set with Jimmy Dean, Eddy Arnold. Then laugh a little with the classic standup by Andy Griffith, “What It Was, Was Football.”
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  1. Nice to hear "Georgie Girl" again. I remember seeing the movie when it was first released -- that was back when I lived across the street from the local cinema. From memory, I think they were the first Australian singing group to have a song nominated for an Oscar.

    1. The mid 60's were AM pop radio's heyday and I recall this song was just all over the dial. I would have still been in grade school and I couldn't quite understand what was meant by "Georgie Go." (at least that's how it sounded) There were so many memorable songs in that period that KC's Oldies 95 centered their format around it for awhile. I still regard that song as a "signature" for that time.